Thursday, May 5, 2016

Book Beginning: Boundary Layer by Kem Luther



THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON FRIDAYS FOR BOOK BEGINNING FUN!

Please join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires. Please remember to include the title of the book and the author’s name.

EARLY BIRDS & SLOWPOKES: This weekly post goes up Thursday evening for those who like to get their posts up and linked early on. But feel free to add a link all week.

FACEBOOK: Rose City Reader has a Facebook page where I post about new and favorite books, book events, and other bookish tidbits, as well as link to blog posts. I'd love a "Like" on the page! You can go to the page here to Like it. I am happy to Like you back if you have a blog or professional Facebook page, so please leave a comment with a link and I will find you.

TWITTER, ETC: If you are on Twitter, Google+, or other social media, please post using the hash tag #BookBeginnings. I try to follow all Book  Beginnings participants on whatever interweb sites you are on, so please let me know if I have missed any and I will catch up.

TIE IN: The Friday 56 hosted by Freda's Voice is a natural tie in with this event and there is a lot of cross over, so many people combine the two. The idea is to post a teaser from page 56 of the book you are reading and share a link to your post. Find details and the Linky for your Friday 56 post on Freda’s Voice.

YOUR BOOK BEGINNING



MY BOOK BEGINNING



A European-derived culture thrust itself into the Pacific Northwest in the first half of the nineteenth century. Tens of thousands of settlers crowded onto the Oregon Trail and by the middle of the 1850s lands that the North American aboriginals had managed for millenia suddenly had new managers.

-- Boundary Layer: Exploring the Genius Between Worlds by Kem Luther, published by OSU Press. The "boundary layer" is the band of air nearest the ground, and where you find lichens, mosses, ferns, fungi, and other diminutive plant life.

In Luther's new book of essays, he explores this boundary layer and introduces readers to the scientists who study it, all in a conversational style and with an eye for detail that makes the book enjoyable for any nature enthusiast who enjoys a good story.

14 comments :

Laurel-Rain Snow said...

Interesting! Thanks for sharing...

guiltless reader said...

Beautiful, beautiful!

Terra Hangen said...

I do like books about nature.

Lauren Stoolfire said...

I like the sound of the snippet! I have a question though, does it really go into the Oregon Trail for any length of time+ :)

Faith Hope and Cherrytea said...

Definitely an issue we are continually dealing with here in Canada, it's a great opener and sounds a fascinating read. Thanks for the intro!

Yvonne@fiction-books said...

Hi Gilion,

What an intriguing concept for a book - nature, with a story - so much more interesting for those of us who don't particularly enjoy reading factual books :)

Marianne North, an artist and botanist, took a very similar approach, combining her love of nature, painting and travel, into a storylike reading experience. Her exhibition of paintings at the famous Kew Gardens, is amazing!

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/9748332-abundant-beauty?from_search=true&search_version=service.

Thanks for sharing such an interesting post this week and for hosting BBOF :)

Yvonne

Anne Bennett said...

You always pick up such interesting topics I would never even consider reading...and I notice that a lot of the books are published at OSU. Where do you find your books?

Bev Bouwer said...

I agree with Anne, I would NEVER think of looking for a book like this. It sounds fascinating, however. Enjoy.

Juli Witte said...

Ooh I'd love to read this one, it sounds really interesting! I always feel more well-informed after reading a non-fiction book. Thanks for sharing and hosting! :) I hope you have a great next week!
My Friday Post
Juli @ Universe in Words

Katherine P said...

I've never thought of the place where moss and lichens grow as having a specific name. This sounds absolutely fascinating and completely unexpected.

Sherry Fundin said...

Never heard it called that before. Very interesting.
sherry @ fundinmental Friday Memes

Mandy Sickle said...

While this isn't my kind of book I do think it sounds interesting. I've never heard of it before. I hope you enjoy your book this week. Have a great week and happy reading!!!

LuAnn Braley said...

I imagine it's like its own little world down there, close to the ground. Have a great week!

Here's my Book Beginnings.

Debbie Rodgers said...

I'm late linking up this week. Thanks for hosting!

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