Monday, December 31, 2018

Mailbox New Year's Eve Monday

Did you get books for Christmas?

I got a few, and one surprise that came in the mail:



Live and Let Pie by Ellie Alexander, the latest in her delightful Bakeshop Mysteries series.

These are the three from Santa:



Bruno, Chief of Police by Martin Walker. This is the first in a mystery series set in the south of France. I gave it to myself because I’m turning into my Grandma and putting presents for myself under the tree.

Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan. This historic fiction is based on a true story about a WWII Italian resistance fighter and spy.

American Audacity: In Defense of Literary Daring by William Giraldi. Hubby got this for me because I read a review and it sounds fascinating.




Thanks for joining me for Mailbox Monday, a weekly "show & tell" blog event where participants share the books they acquired the week before. Visit the Mailbox Monday website to find links to all the participants' posts and read more about Books that Caught our Eye.

Mailbox Monday is graciously hosted by Leslie of Under My Apple Tree, Serena of Savvy Verse & Wit, and Martha of Reviews by Martha's Bookshelf.

Sunday, December 30, 2018

2019 CHALLENGE: 2X19 and Mt. TBR

2X19 CHALLENGE:
READ 38 TBR BOOKS IN 2019



As I've done since 2014, I'm combining the Mt. TBR Challenge with a TBR challenge I came up with to read two books for each year of the century. It gets a little more challenging each year. I didn't reach my goal in 2018, in part because I got distracted by other books on my TBR shelf, in part because I picked a couple of dense chunksters that slowed me down.

So I confess I intentionally picked some short books for 2019 (short in pages, not height, but see below). I like the mix. I'm usually drawn to long novels, so consciously choosing short books will make me read some books that have been waiting on my TBR shelves for a long, long time.

I am going to read 38 books for the 2X19 part of the challenge, one from each of 38 separate shelves on my various TBR bookcases. I have 29 fiction books and nine nonfiction books picked out.

MY 2X19 BOOKS


Here are the books in the order I plan to read them. The first two come first because they are my New Year's resolution books. The next two come early because I'm most excited to read them. The rest I am reading in order of height, from tallest to shortest, for no reason except whim.

A Year of Living Kindly: Choices That Will Change Your Life and the World Around You by Donna Cameron (RCR interview here)

On Reading Well: Finding the Good Life through Great Books by Karen Swallow Prior

The Girl from Oto by Amy Maroney (RCR interview here)

The Shame of Losing by Sarah Cannon (RCR interview here)

An Affair with a House by Bunny Williams

Mark Hampton on Decorating by Mark Hampton

The Tenth Man by Graham Greene

Friend of My Springtime by Willa Cather

Licking Flames: Tales of a Half-Assed Hussy by Diana Kirk (RCR interview here)

Queen of Spades by Michael Shou-Yung Shum

Zuckerman Unbound by Philip Roth

The Last Thing He Wanted by Joan Didion

The Robineau Look by Kathleen Moore Knight

Agents and Patients by Anthony Powell

Sexing the Cherry by Jeanette Winterson

A Woman of Means by Peter Taylor

The Poorhouse Fair by John Updike

Girl, 20 by Kingsley Amis

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

Slam by Nick Hornby

Lady Into Fox by David Garnett (James Tait Black Memorial Prize Winner)

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats by T. S. Eliot

The Great Mortdecai Moustache Mystery by Kyril Bonfiglioli

The Gift of a Letter by Alexandra Stoddard

Do the Windows Open? by Julie Hecht

Dirty Friends by Morris Lurie

Something Special by Iris Murdoch

The Imitation Game by Ian McEwan

The Small Room by May Sarton

I'd Rather Be Reading: The Delights and Dilemmas of the Reading Life by Anne Bogel

The Little Book of Lykke by Meik Wiking

The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy

The Heart-Keeper by Fran├žoise Sagan

The Abbess of Crewe by Muriel Spark

Levels of Life by Julian Barnes

First Love by Joyce Carol Oates



THE MT. TBR CHALLENGE:
READ A TOTAL OF 60 TBR BOOKS IN 2019



Every year, I join Bev at My Reader's Block in her Mt, TBR Challenge. This year, I am going to climb higher than ever (or try), to reach the Mr. Kilimanjaro level of 60 books. I tried this in 2018 and fell sort by two books because I didn't get through all of my 2X18 books. This year, I have to read 22 in addition to the 38 from my 2X19 Challenge. We'll see how it goes.








Saturday, December 29, 2018

2019 CHALLENGE: The European Reading Challenge

MY SIGN-UP POST


This is my sign-up post for the 2019 European Reading Challenge. 

To sign up yourself (and I hope you do), go to the main Challenge page here or click the picture above. 

The European Reading Challenge is a tour of Europe through books. The idea is to read books by European authors or books set in European countries (no matter where the author comes from).

Participants sign up to read 1 to 5 books. In addition, the person who reads and reviews books from the most countries wins a prize.

I'm signing up for the "Five Star (Deluxe Entourage)" level to read five books.

BOOK POSSIBILITIES

So far, my likely books are the following and anything else will come along by happenstance.

The Girl from Oto by Amy Maroney (Spain)

The Abbess of Crewe by Muriel Spark (U.K.)

The Heart-Keeper by Françoise Sagan (France)

The Little Book of Lykke by Meik Wiking (Denmark)

BOOKS FINISHED

None yet.








Thursday, December 27, 2018

Book Beginning: Outline by Rachel Cusk

BOOK BEGINNINGS ON FRIDAYS
THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON FRIDAYS FOR BOOK BEGINNING FUN!

MY BOOK BEGINNING



Before the flight I was invited for lunch at a London club with a billionaire I'd been promised had liberal credentials.

-- Outline by Rachel Cusk. I only heard of this trilogy recently, when it popped up on someone's (I no longer remember whose) "favorite books I read in 2018" list. I started it yesterday and was immediately pulled in to this "story in ten conversations."




Please join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires. Please remember to include the title of the book and the author’s name.

EARLY BIRDS & SLOWPOKES: This weekly post goes up Thursday evening for those who like to get their posts up and linked early on. But feel free to add a link all week.

FACEBOOK: Rose City Reader has a Facebook page where I post about new and favorite books, book events, and other bookish tidbits, as well as link to blog posts. I'd love a "Like" on the page! You can go to the page here to Like it. I am happy to Like you back if you have a blog or professional Facebook page, so please leave a comment with a link and I will find you.

TWITTER, ETC: If you are on Twitter, Instagram, Google+, or other social media, please post using the hash tag #BookBeginnings. I try to follow all Book  Beginnings participants on whatever interweb sites you are on, so please let me know if I have missed any and I will catch up.

TIE IN: The Friday 56 hosted by Freda's Voice is a natural tie in with this event and there is a lot of cross over, so many people combine the two. The idea is to post a teaser from page 56 of the book you are reading and share a link to your post. Find details and the Linky for your Friday 56 post on Freda’s Voice.

YOUR BOOK BEGINNING




Thursday, December 20, 2018

Book Beginning: Grit and Ink by William F. Willingham

BOOK BEGINNINGS ON FRIDAYS
THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON FRIDAYS FOR BOOK BEGINNING FUN!

MY BOOK BEGINNING



The publishing company that is the focus of this history had its origins in a in a feisty, nineteenth century frontier newspaper located in Pendleton, Oregon.

-- from Chapter I, "Frontier town gets a newspaper," in Grit and Ink: An Oregon Family’s Adventures in Newspapering, 1908–2018 by William F. Willingham, with a Preface by Stephen A. Forrester and a Forward by R. Gregory Nokes.

Pendleton, Oregon is on the opposite side of the state from Astoria, on the Pacific Ocean, but two newspapers and two families linked the cities for generations. Grit and Ink tells the story of these connections and the importance of home-based journalism.

It would make a great holiday gift for readers interested in the newspaper business, local journalism, or Oregon history.



Please join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires. Please remember to include the title of the book and the author’s name.

EARLY BIRDS & SLOWPOKES: This weekly post goes up Thursday evening for those who like to get their posts up and linked early on. But feel free to add a link all week.

FACEBOOK: Rose City Reader has a Facebook page where I post about new and favorite books, book events, and other bookish tidbits, as well as link to blog posts. I'd love a "Like" on the page! You can go to the page here to Like it. I am happy to Like you back if you have a blog or professional Facebook page, so please leave a comment with a link and I will find you.

TWITTER, ETC: If you are on Twitter, Instagram, Google+, or other social media, please post using the hash tag #BookBeginnings. I try to follow all Book  Beginnings participants on whatever interweb sites you are on, so please let me know if I have missed any and I will catch up.

TIE IN: The Friday 56 hosted by Freda's Voice is a natural tie in with this event and there is a lot of cross over, so many people combine the two. The idea is to post a teaser from page 56 of the book you are reading and share a link to your post. Find details and the Linky for your Friday 56 post on Freda’s Voice.

YOUR BOOK BEGINNING




5 Days to Christmas!




Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: What's Going Well? by Greg Bell



What's going wrong is insidious and sneaky; it doesn't leave fingerprints, but it has victims everywhere. It distorts our ability to notice the good things in life, infecting the human psyche like an invisible plague.

What's Going Well?: The Question that Changes Everything by Greg Bell. A guide to developing an optimism mindset, from the author of Water the Bamboo.



Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by The Purple Booker, where you can find the official rules for this weekly event.

7 Days to Christmas!




Saturday, December 15, 2018

Author Interview: Donna Cameron



Author Donna Cameron explores the power of kindness in her new book, A Year of Living Kindly: Choices That Will Change Your Life and the World Around You.



Donna recently talked with Rose City Reader about her book, the concept of kindness, and her life as a writer:

How did you come to write A Year of Living Kindly?

I’ve always been awed by kind people and wanted to be kinder myself. It’s not that I was unkind, but I think for most of my life, I settled for nice. At the beginning of 2015, I decided to make a year-long deep-dive into kindness. I wanted to explore it, both from a personal, experiential perspective and also an investigative one. I saw that science was finally looking at kindness – measuring, testing, and coming up with solid evidence that kindness has quantifiable benefits. I shared my research as well as my experience and observations in my Year of Living Kindly blog. For me, the blog was a good way to stay accountable and committed.

I called it “A Year of Living Kindly,” but saw very early on that kindness isn’t something you adopt for a year and then decide to move on to learning how to salsa dance or play the accordion. I knew I was making a lifelong commitment to kindness. With some encouragement from the incredible community that was following my blog, I decided in 2016 to turn what I had learned and shared into a book.

What is your background and how did it prepare you to write a book about kindness?

I spent my career working with nonprofit groups and causes. It was there where I really saw kindness in action on a daily basis. People who work with nonprofits – whether they’re charitable and philanthropic groups, or trade and professional organizations – don’t do it for the money. Mostly, they volunteer their time and talent because they believe in a cause and they want to give back.

That undoubtedly influenced my interest in kindness. I saw its power and also saw that a lot of people mistakenly think kindness is weak or insubstantial, when, in fact, it’s a strength – a superpower.

What did you learn from writing your book – either about the subject of the book or the writing process – that most surprised you?

With regard to my subject, I learned that the deeper I delved into kindness, the more kindness filled my world. It really reinforced the oft-spoken notion that what you look for is what you will find. Wayne Muller says it best: “Whatever you are giving your time and attention to, day after day, is the kind of person you will eventually become.” And he also said, “When we do what we love, again and again, our life comes to hold the fragrance of that thing.” My world is now fragrant with kindness.

With regard to writing, as frivolous as this may sound, I learned the importance of fun. I’ve always been a writer and loved writing, but I saw more clearly than ever while writing this book – and also while promoting it – that for me, fun is a huge part of the process. Playing with words and ideas really is play, and the more I bring a sense of adventure and fun to it, the freer and more powerful the writing.

What will readers learn from your book?

I hope readers will recognize that kindness is a strength and it often takes courage, and also that they possess that strength and courage. I hope people will see what might sometimes get in the way of their kindness and how to avoid those potholes. I hope they’ll understand the skills of kindness they’re all fairly simple, but they take practice and paying attention.

I hope people will see that there’s no such thing as a small kindness and that our kindnesses create ripples that go out beyond our imagining. I hope people see that even though we seem to be in the midst of an epidemic of unkindness and incivility, we can spread kindness and change the epidemic. Because kindness really is contagious. I hope they’ll see that they always have a choice – and they can always choose kindness.

And I hope they’ll be entertained. While the book is under the broad umbrella of “self-help,” I’m not telling anyone how to live their life or claiming to have found the “true path” to anything. I’m sharing what I’ve learned about kindness and how it’s transformed my life, in the hope that readers will customize it to their own lives.

You have said that you are inspired by the idea of “pursuing unanswerable questions in good company.” Can you explain that a bit?

This is a notion the amazing Rachel Naomi Remen put forward and as soon as I heard it, its truth resonated for me. I love the power of mystery – of not-knowing and not having to have answers to every question. The enjoyment is in exploring ideas and what-ifs, and doing it with people who also share that desire – who don’t always have to be right or have certainty. While many things are black and white, the most interesting ideas are the nuances, the shades of gray. Curiosity is one of our most powerful tools – both as writers and as human beings.

Who are your three (or four or five) favorite authors? Is your own writing influenced by the authors you read?

I majored in Russian literature, and still have a passion for the great Russian authors, but my more contemporary favorites in fiction include Ann Patchett, Elinor Lipman, and the astonishing Robertson Davies. In non-fiction, I love great essayists, among them Rebecca Solnit, Meghan Daum, Anne Lamott, Nora Ephron, and many others.

I think I am influenced by everything I read. Everything deepens the well. I enjoy seeing how authors put words and ideas together – a fresh metaphor, a phrase that captures the essence of a concept, crisp dialogue. Fifteen years ago, I attended a four-day intensive workshop on storytelling with Rachel Remen, and what I learned has served me in myriad ways. Rachel’s two books (Kitchen Table Wisdom and My Grandfather’s Blessings) are two of my all-time favorites – books I reread every couple of years and have given as gifts countless times.

What kind of books do you like to read? What are you reading now?

I love well-crafted fiction. I love reading both memoirs and biographies. I am captivated by good essays. I also enjoy a good, character-driven mystery. My TBR list is voluminous and I keep adding to it. Currently, I’m reading Barbara Kingsolver’s new book, Unsheltered. Her books are a master class in the crafts of writing and storytelling.

You have a terrific website and blog, and are also active on Twitter and Facebook. From an author's perspective, how important is the internet to promote your book?

As long as we don’t succumb to addiction and sacrifice writing time to social media compulsion, these tools are vital. My website and blog are a place to connect with thoughtful, like-minded people. And I’ve found Facebook and Twitter to be marvelous places to create community. While there’s plenty to avoid on both platforms, the generosity of other writers and other kindness advocates is consistently inspiring. While the act of writing is of necessity solitary, the community of writers is a treasure beyond measure that many writers may overlook.

Do you have any events coming up to promote your book?

With the holidays upon us, my book events have come to a temporary halt. I do have a few speaking engagements in the new year and hope to have a few more bookstore appearances (my events are posted on my website). During these quiet weeks, I’m looking forward to more time for reading.

What is the most valuable advice you’ve been given as an author?

The tried-and-true advice on butt-in-chair, just-write-even-if-it’s-crap, and writers write, are all obvious, basic, and also truths we need to continually remind ourselves.

One piece of advice that came to me sort of through a back door happened when I was talking with another author a few months before my book came out. She said she wished she could have a do-over because she was so stressed during her publication year that she didn’t enjoy it. She said she was miserable, worrying about all the things she should be doing and all the things she didn’t have time to do, as well as all the things she might not be doing perfectly. I decided then and there that I wanted to be able to look back on this year and say (or sing), “I had the time of my life!” So I tried to have fun in everything I did and didn’t worry about the things I didn’t have time or bandwidth to do. As a result, this has been one of the most joy-filled years of my life.

What is the best thing about being a writer?

Two things:

Number one: discovery. For me writing is a process of discovery. It helps me clarify my thoughts, and come face-to-face with new ideas. There is magic in rereading something I’ve just written and wondering, “Where did that come from?” and even saying (modestly, of course), “Wasn’t that nicely put!”

Number two: touching lives. Nothing compares with the feeling one gets when a reader takes the time to comment – to say they liked your book, it made them laugh, it touched them or in some way changed them.

What’s next? Are you working on your next book?

These last six months of book promotion have been pretty intensive. I’ve continued to write blog posts and to write quite a few articles that have been placed in a wide variety of publications. As the book promotion settles down, I am looking forward to getting back into a more regular writing routine. Right now, I am feeling drawn to shorter forms. I love writing essays have several topics I’m eager to dive in to. I feel like this year has prepared me to be more bold and courageous in my writing, and also to be more playful. I’m eager to see what’s next.


THANK YOU, DONNA!

A YEAR OF LIVING KINDLY IS AVAILABLE ONLINE, OR ASK YOUR LOCAL BOOKSELLER TO ORDER IT!


10 Days to Christmas!




Thursday, December 13, 2018

Book Beginning: What's Going Well?: The Question that Changes Everything by Greg Bell

BOOK BEGINNINGS ON FRIDAYS
THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON FRIDAYS FOR BOOK BEGINNING FUN!

MY BOOK BEGINNING



Since I can remember, I've been preoccupied with the question of why some people reach their full potential and others don't.

What's Going Well?: The Question that Changes Everything by Greg Bell. Greg wrote the popular and powerfully motivating book, Water the Bamboo. In his new book, he teaches how to build a habit of optimism.

Wouldn't we all like to learn to be a little more optimistic?





Please join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires. Please remember to include the title of the book and the author’s name.

EARLY BIRDS & SLOWPOKES: This weekly post goes up Thursday evening for those who like to get their posts up and linked early on. But feel free to add a link all week.

FACEBOOK: Rose City Reader has a Facebook page where I post about new and favorite books, book events, and other bookish tidbits, as well as link to blog posts. I'd love a "Like" on the page! You can go to the page here to Like it. I am happy to Like you back if you have a blog or professional Facebook page, so please leave a comment with a link and I will find you.

TWITTER, ETC: If you are on Twitter, Instagram, Google+, or other social media, please post using the hash tag #BookBeginnings. I try to follow all Book  Beginnings participants on whatever interweb sites you are on, so please let me know if I have missed any and I will catch up.

TIE IN: The Friday 56 hosted by Freda's Voice is a natural tie in with this event and there is a lot of cross over, so many people combine the two. The idea is to post a teaser from page 56 of the book you are reading and share a link to your post. Find details and the Linky for your Friday 56 post on Freda’s Voice.

YOUR BOOK BEGINNING

12 Days to Christmas!




Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Teaser Tuesday: A Year of Living Kindly by Donna Cameron




Kind is very different. Kind means connecting; it means being aware and intentional about the impact my words and actions have; it means expending energy and effort, and caring about the outcome.

-- A Year of Living Kindly: Choices That Will Change Your Life and the World Around You by Donna Cameron.

My New Year's resolution is to read Donna Cameron's book and to practice a year of living kindly!



Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by The Purple Booker, where you can find the official rules for this weekly event.

14 Days to Christmas!




Monday, December 10, 2018

Mailbox Monday

Three different types of books showed up at my house last week. What new books did you get?



What's Going Well?: The Question that Changes Everything by Greg Bell. This latest book from the author of Water the Bamboo teaches how to build a habit of optimism. We can all work on our optimism skills!




The Adults by Caroline Hulse. Ex-es decide to spend Christmas together for the sake of their daughter. Then they decide it would be OK to bring their new sweethearts. Chaos and comedy ensue. Looks like the perfect book for a cozy Christmas weekend!



Speaking Volumes: Conversations with Remarkable Writers by Ramona Koval. Koval is an Australian journalist known for her interviews of authors. This book collects 28 of her interviews, including Ian McEwan, A. S. Byatt, and Saul Bellow.




Thanks for joining me for Mailbox Monday, a weekly "show & tell" blog event where participants share the books they acquired the week before. Visit the Mailbox Monday website to find links to all the participants' posts and read more about Books that Caught our Eye.

Mailbox Monday is graciously hosted by Leslie of Under My Apple Tree, Serena of Savvy Verse & Wit, and Martha of Reviews by Martha's Bookshelf.

15 Days to Christmas!




Thursday, December 6, 2018

Book Beginning: Warnings Unheeded by Andy Brown

BOOK BEGINNINGS ON FRIDAYS
THANKS FOR JOINING ME ON FRIDAYS FOR BOOK BEGINNING FUN!

MY BOOK BEGINNING



“Fairchild Police to all posts and patrols, we have an alarm at the ER. Informational, we have an individual in the hospital running around with a shotgun.”
-- Warnings Unheeded: Twin Tragedies at Fairchild Air Force Base by Andy Brown.

Andy Brown is the Air Force Security Forces airman who ended the 1994 mass shooting at Fairchild air force base. His new book chronicles the history of that event and an intentional airplane crash four days later, drawing on his own experience, medical records, police reports, and first-hand accounts.





Please join me every Friday to share the first sentence (or so) of the book you are reading, along with your initial thoughts about the sentence, impressions of the book, or anything else the opener inspires. Please remember to include the title of the book and the author’s name.

EARLY BIRDS & SLOWPOKES: This weekly post goes up Thursday evening for those who like to get their posts up and linked early on. But feel free to add a link all week.

FACEBOOK: Rose City Reader has a Facebook page where I post about new and favorite books, book events, and other bookish tidbits, as well as link to blog posts. I'd love a "Like" on the page! You can go to the page here to Like it. I am happy to Like you back if you have a blog or professional Facebook page, so please leave a comment with a link and I will find you.

TWITTER, ETC: If you are on Twitter, Instagram, Google+, or other social media, please post using the hash tag #BookBeginnings. I try to follow all Book  Beginnings participants on whatever interweb sites you are on, so please let me know if I have missed any and I will catch up.

TIE IN: The Friday 56 hosted by Freda's Voice is a natural tie in with this event and there is a lot of cross over, so many people combine the two. The idea is to post a teaser from page 56 of the book you are reading and share a link to your post. Find details and the Linky for your Friday 56 post on Freda’s Voice.

YOUR BOOK BEGINNING




19 Days to Christmas!




Wednesday, December 5, 2018

2018 CHALLENGE: European Reading Challenge Wrap Up

COMPLETED

This is my personal wrap up post for the 2018 European Reading Challenge.

If you have completed the 2018 challenge, please got to the official wrap up page and add a link to your wrap up post. To post a review for a 2018 book, please go to the review page.

The 2019 challenge will be posted ASAP.

BOOKS I READ

The Virgin in the Garden by A. S. Byatt (UK)

The Tsar of Love and Techno by Anthony Marra (Russia)

Long Ago in France: The Years in Dijon by M. F. K. Fisher (France)

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson (Sweden)

Austerlitz by W. G. Sebald (Germany; National Book Critics Circle Award winner)

The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride (Ireland; James Tate Black Memorial Prize winner)

Nemesis by Jo Nesbo (Norway)

Exodus by Leon Uris (Belgium)

Waiting for Sunrise by William Boyd (Austria)

The Janissary Tree by Jason Goodwin (Turkey; Edgar Award winner)

Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante (Italy)

Gertrude and Claudius by John Updike (Denmark)

Outline by Rachel Cusk (Greece)

I visited a total of 13 different countries for this challenge, which is pretty good for me. What is better, for me, is that four of the books were translated to English from the authors' native languages. I read a lot of books set in other countries, but not usually by authors from other countries.






20 Days to Christmas!




Monday, December 3, 2018

Mailbox Holiday Monday: Grit and Ink

One new book came into my house last week.



Grit and Ink: An Oregon Family’s Adventures in Newspapering, 1908–2018 by William F. Willingham, new from OSU Press.

Astoria and Pendleton are on opposite sides of Oregon, but were linked by two newspapers and two families for generations. This book tells the story of how and why these connections were important for those communities and for the state.

It would make a good holiday gift for readers interested in local journalism, the newspaper business, and Oregon history.


Thanks for joining me for Mailbox Monday, a weekly "show & tell" blog event where participants share the books they acquired the week before. Visit the Mailbox Monday website to find links to all the participants' posts and read more about Books that Caught our Eye.

Mailbox Monday is graciously hosted by Leslie of Under My Apple Tree, Serena of Savvy Verse & Wit, and Martha of Reviews by Martha's Bookshelf.

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